Why Consider Drinking Cider Now?

When seeing a few hard cider offerings in the store, you see the usual offenders. The large commercial ciders out there can be too sweet, too simple, or simply unknown. Come with me, for a second, to a place where you are open to trying cider. Why should you consider drinking cider right now? I can give you a few reasons, six to be exact.

Gluten-free

Many wines and beers carry gluten.  If you have celiac disease, aka gluten intolerance, ciders can be the perfect match to get your buzz game on. While everyone is not gluten intolerant, some people still have sensitivity to gluten and feel the sensation of being full. If you drink cider, you can avoid that issue.

Health Benefits

As we have previously written, cider has many benefits. From their soluble and insoluble fibers to the rich vitamins, cider follows the “apple a day” mantra. Natural sugar is important for your body and provides the needed energy to survive and thrive.  Those rich fibers help keep your systems in check and fully hydrated. Plus, those beautiful antioxidants really do wonders for you by preventing disease, sickness, and keeping your diet on track.  Want to learn more, read out article here.

Dry, Sweet, or Funky

Don’t mind the simple, commercial ciders out there. Craft cideries have been popping up all across the country and they are doing something to write home about. These craft companies are doing things like using MLF to get smooth cider flavors, using cinnamon & roasted flavor to make a new holiday favorite, and making ciders as crisp and dry as champagne. Based off of the cider makers objective, cider really can run the flavor and complexity gambit. From apple choice to the selected fermentation process, right down to how a company will backsweeten their product, cider dances to the beat of whatever drum they are given. Dance, Apple, dance!




Find Your Roots

You probably thought beer was the major alcoholic beverage of choice forever in America, right? Wrong. Cider was the popular choice for years before beer even made it to the top spot. Above that, cider was the cheapest, most accessible beverage of choice in the United States.  Our founding fathers and peppy settlers came in and kept up their cider drinking habits from the good ‘ole days in England.  With people like Johnny Appleseed (yes, he was real) spreading the seed, apples were being grown nation-wide.  And, with potentially contaminated water everywhere, beverages like cider were popular for their sterile nature and low alcoholic content.  Now, cider nearly vanished from the scene during Prohibition as many orchards were burned down.  Cider wasn’t able to recover as people shifted to beer, turning new or remaining orchards into cooking or eating apple orchards. Beer production became cheaper and resources grew, but it doesn’t mean we shouldn’t return to our roots. Cider has boomed in recent history and you should feel a wave of nostalgia for the Englishmen and the earliest settlers.

Local Apples, No Problem

With over 7,500 varieties of apples in the United States, the flavor of your apples and hard cider can vary dramatically. With four major varieties of apples, there is a way to distinguish subsets of this fruit.  And, within those four major cuts, there are finer, more developed distinguishing features. From extremely dry to extremely sweet, forget not the very tannic apples, cider can really take on a mind of its own when using a particular apple or blend of apples. The possibilities are endeless.

Hops, Wine, a Path of Choice

It is now common practice for cideries to use cascade hops in one of their cider offerings to appeal to beer drinkers. On a similar foot, cider withstands a form of fermentation like wine, so why not give it a try? As the cider makers form decisions on flavor profiles, they often want to make the commercial drinker or beer/wine drinker happy. When making buttery ciders, they find a niche for moscato lovers. By making ciders that are as dry as possible, they appeal to the sophisticated champagne drinkers. If you have a particular love for a beer, wine, or liquor, chances are there is a cider following a similar pattern. For me, I love porters and darker beers.  Cider makers have been blending fresh roasted coffee beans, nutmeg, and cinnamon into offerings that give me a familiar, if not slightly sweeter, sensation. Cider really does know how to play well with any palate.

All in All

So, there you have it. These are the six major reasons cider gets me excidered.  There is something about the history and ever expanding world of cider making that everyone should be able to appreciate. May you have a gluten allergy or you simply want to try something like a beer, cider may be your next choice. Forget about the commercial cider, too, go craft and taste the creativity.

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